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Our Daily Dance in Time and Space

Joanne Heyink Leestemaker, Leon van Berlo

Abstract


Various applications of geo-referenced information currently being developed are or will be both commercially and publicly available. These applications combine functions such as mobile communication, GPS, digital photography, e-mail, cartography, satellite imaging and internet access. One of the first applications of so-called ‘location based services (LBS)’ has been the tracking & tracing of convicts on parole and animal species in the wild. In the United States, web-based products are available that enable parents to trace the whereabouts of their children, so-called child monitoring services.

Locative media are also a powerful tool in the hands of urban investigators wishing to learn directly from users the specific routes they take and the locations or events they attend. Locative media can help to unveil the specific mental maps that an individual user has in his or her head. The experience and perception of a place or route can be reported by residents by means of short texts and photos.

We decided to further develop geographical research techniques such as Hägerstrand’s space-time path and diary analysis. In doing so we developed sense of the city as a method of providing insight into the simultaneous but diverse patterns and experiences of people in regard to time and space.


Keywords


Location Based Services; LBS; GPS; Locative Media; Hägerstrand; Space-Time Path; Diary Analysis

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References


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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7480/rius.1.200

Copyright (c) 2013 Joanne Heyink Leestemaker, Leon van Berlo

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